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...Selling Assets Business

To register for this live teleseminar, please click here

About the Teleseminar

The general rule is that when a buyer takes ownership of an asset it takes ownership only of the asset and not also the liabilities or other obligations of the seller, unless those other liabilities are explicitly assumed.  But there are plentiful exceptions to the general rule that tag the buyer with substantial liability for the debt or other obligations of the seller’s business.  This liability can dramatically scuttle the basic economic assumptions of the parties entering the sale.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to identifying the risks of successor liability in various transactions, including liability under common and statutory law, special bankruptcy and foreclosure issues, and discuss drafting techniques to limit or eliminate the risk of successor liability.

  •  Successor liability in asset purchases in ordinary and major business transactions
  •   Fact patterns giving rise to successor liability – business continuation, de facto mergers, fraud,   product  line continuation
  •   Buyer liability at UCC Article 9 foreclosure sales
  •   Successor liability under federal employment and environmental statutes and state
      sales/use tax law    
  •   Special issues in buying property out of bankruptcy
  •   Drafting techniques to limit or eliminate the risk of liability


About the Speaker


John Murdock is a partner in the Nashville office of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings, LLP, where his practice includes business acquisitions and dispositions, commercial lending, and commercial law generally.  He is a member of the Commercial Financial Services Committee of the ABA Business Law Section and formerly served as chair of its Lender Liability Subcommittee.  He is also a Fellow of the American College of Commercial Finance Lawyers.  Mr. Murdock received his B.S., magna cum laude, from Vanderbilt University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University Law School.

Mandatory MCLE Credit Hours

This seminar qualifies for 1.0 MCLE Credit Hour (Tentative)